Tag Archives: Bill Siegel

CPSC Identifies Manufacturers of Problem Drywall Made in China

Chinese DrywallWASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is releasing today the names of the problem drywall manufacturers whose drywall emitted high levels of hydrogen sulfide in testing conducted for the agency by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). There is a strong association between hydrogen sulfide and metal corrosion.

 

Of the samples tested, the top ten reactive sulfur-emitting drywall samples were all produced in China. Some of the Chinese drywall had emission rates of hydrogen sulfide 100 times greater than non-Chinese drywall samples.
“Homeowners who have problem drywall in their homes are suffering greatly”, said CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum. “I appeal to these Chinese drywall companies to carefully examine their responsibilities to U.S. families who have been harmed and do what is fair and just”.
At the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue meetings in Beijing May 24-25, U.S. officials pressed the Chinese government to facilitate a meeting between CPSC and the Chinese drywall companies whose products were used in U.S. homes, and which exhibit the emissions identified during the testing procedures. The Strategic and Economic Dialogue represents the highest-level bilateral forum to discuss a broad range of issues between the two nations.
The following list identifies the top 10 drywall samples tested that had the highest emissions of hydrogen sulfide, along with the identity of the manufacturer of the drywall and the year of manufacture, from highest to lowest.
– Knauf Plasterboard (Tianjin) Co. Ltd.: (year of manufacture 2005) China
– Taian Taishan Plasterboard Co. Ltd.: (2006) China
– Shandong Taihe Dongxin Co.: (2005) China
– Knauf Plasterboard (Tianjin) Co. Ltd.: (2006) China
– Taian Taishan Plasterboard Co. Ltd.: (2006) China
– Taian Taishan Plasterboard Co. Ltd.: (2006) China
– Shandong Chenxiang GBM Co. Ltd. (C&K Gypsum Board): (2006) China
– Beijing New Building Materials (BNBM): (2009) China
– Taian Taishan Plasterboard Co. Ltd.: (2009) China
– Shandong Taihe Dongxin Co.: (2009) China

Other Chinese drywall samples had low or no detectable emissions of hydrogen sulfide as did the drywall samples tested that were manufactured domestically. They include: Knauf Plasterboard Tianjin: (2009) China; Tiger ***ShiGao JianCai***liangpianzhuang: (2006) China; USG Corporation: (2009) U.S.; Guangdong Knauf New Building Material Products Co. Ltd.: (2009) China; 3/8″ drywall manufacturer uncertain (date uncertain): China; Knauf Plasterboard (Wuhu) Co. Ltd.: (2009) China; CertainTeed Corp.: (2009) U.S.; Georgia Pacific Corp.: (2009) U.S.; Dragon Brand, Beijing New Building Materials Co. Ltd.: (2006) China; CertainTeed Corp.: (2009) U.S.; Pingyi Baier Building Materials Co. Ltd.: (2009) China; Sample purchased in China, manufacturer unknown: (2009) China; Panel Rey S.A.: (2009) Mexico; Lafarge North America: (2009) U.S.; National Gypsum Company: (2009) U.S.; National Gypsum Company: (2009) U.S.; Georgia Pacific Corp.: (2009) U.S.; Pabco Gypsum: (2009) U.S.; Temple-Inland Inc.: (2009) U.S.; and USG Corporation: (2009) U.S.
Last month, CPSC released the results of drywall emissions tests by LBNL. The studies showed a connection between certain Chinese drywall and corrosion in homes. In addition, the patterns of reactive sulfur compounds emitted from drywall samples show a clear distinction between certain Chinese drywall samples manufactured in 2005/2006 and other Chinese and non-Chinese drywall samples.
To date, CPSC has spent over $5 million to investigate the chemical nature and the chain of commerce of problem drywall. Earlier this year, CPSC and HUD issued an identification protocol to help consumers identify problem drywall in their homes. Last month, CPSC and HUD issued remediation guidance to assist impacted homeowners.

Go here for the CPSC article: https://www.cpsc.gov/content/cpsc-identifies-manufacturers-of-problem-drywall-made-in-china

Posted by Bill Siegel Florida Home Inspection Team Inc

New Construction

new constructionShould new construction be inspected? This question comes up a lot. Many clients call for an inspection after the property is finished and we do what his called a walk thought inspection. In my most current case it would have been wise to have phase inspections completed. In this case there has been a change of contractor. I was called in to inspect only the electrical to look for code violations. The new electrical contractor did not want to take over the work from the old contractor – he wanted to rip it out and start over. And I can’t really say that I blame him. Most of the work was done in an un-workman- like manner – it was very sloppy, and there definitely a few code     violations.

new constrution

The first and biggest violation was the placement of the interior panel box. The picture at the right shows where he ran the wires. They were at the back-end of the slab. That slab was installed for the washer and dryer, which will not longer fit on the slab due to the placement of the box. Even if the box would fit there, it is a violation of work space and access per the National Electric Code. The code calls for 36 inches of unobstructed work space in front of all panel boxes. In order to work blueprintson the box in the future, the electrician would have to climb on the dryer to have direct access. As you can see from the blueprints, the box was supposed to be placed about 30 inches in front of the slab, which was actually opposite the meter on the exterior wall.

 

 

new constructionThe next code issue was the service lateral. The original electrical contractor had installed Schedule 40 PVC pipe. This pipe is not allowed in this location. Both the NEC and  FPL call for either galvanized pipe or Schedule 80 PVC pipe to be installed. Schedule 40 pipe should never be used in a location that could be subject to physical damage. Schedule 80 and galvanized pipe are much stronger and can withstand more punishment without damaging the pipe.

Posted by Bill Siegel Florida Home Inspection Team Inc

Coastal Flooding

Coastal Flooding

Coastal flooding

Coastal Flooding is becoming a big and bigger issue around the world. The following is a good article on the subject.

http://www.iamagazine.com/strategies/read/2016/05/11/beyond-fema-flood-maps-what-to-tell-your-coastal-customers

The next big question is whose responsibility is it going to be to inform a potential buyer that the home they are about to purchase lies in one of these areas. While it may be common knowledge to people who live in the area, an out-of-town purchaser may not know or even think to ask about this. In Florida, many homeowners are finding that, due to coastal flooding, when they go to make renovations to their home, depending on the cost of that renovation, that they may have to raise the elevation of their home. That usually costs more than the renovation itself.

Coastal Flooding is an issue that should not be taken lightly by anyone in the industry, from real estate agents, mortgage lenders, title companies, appraisers, to home inspectors.

Posted by Bill Siegel Florida Home Inspection Team Inc.

Consumer Alert! Do It Yourself Claims Handling – InsuranceNewsNet

Source: Consumer Alert! Do It Yourself Claims Handling – InsuranceNewsNet

Lets talk about flippers

Flipping houses has been big business, especially in the South Florida over the past few years. As a home inspector they usually present the most challenges in the inspection industry. Most flippers are in business for one reason and one reason only – to make money. I laugh every time I see the show Flip or Flop. I have yet to see them lose money on a house, and of course they always get more than the appraised value. That is usually not the way it works. I have run into multiple people who have taken those courses and have gotten burned.

Most flippers that I run into only do cosmetic upgrades. They install new flooring, paint the interior and exterior, update the kitchens and bathrooms, and maybe do some landscaping. What they overlook is the roof, electrical system, plumbing system, and air conditioning system. The usual cost of these updates is between $20,000 and $30,000. I think they hope no one will find the other deficiencies. A new roof us usually a minimum of $5000.00, an AC system $4000.00, and electrical system can cost anywhere from $2000 to $15,000 depending no the work that needs to be done.

The other thing they forget to do is pull permits for the work that requires them to be pulled. I cannot tell you how many tankless water heaters get installed without a permits. These installations require both an electrical and a plumbing permit. Imaging the look on their face when I tell them that the electrical system needed to be upgraded from that 100 amp system to accommodate the now double electrical amps of a conventional tank water heater.

The last house I was at had all new windows installed. No permits. In Florida, all windows have t be either impact rated or have shutters installed. With no permits we have no way to verify if the correct windows were installed. They left out half of the framing screws. Pulling a permit will guarantee that something is installed correctly, but at least is is a check on the work. And why do a lot of these flippers no pull permits. A lot of them are not licensed contractors, which another whole thread topic. On this particular home the seller admitted that he did not pull permits because it would have been too costly to do the work correctly. Now he is facing fines front the city and currently has a house he cannot sell.

As realtors, I would like to get your feedback about listing one of these houses. Do you check for permits, or look to see what they might have overlooked. I know no one wants to do this, but it might be a good idea to have the house inspected prior to listing it to know the issues that might arise when a buyer comes through with their inspector. It could save a lot of time and heartache for all parties involved.

Posted by Bill Siegel Florida Home Inspection Team Inc.

The history of residential wiring

residential wiringDid you know that the history of residential wiring dates back to 1879 when Thomas Edison lit up a few homes in New York. 1892 he was awarded a patent for the electrical conductor. Armored cable was first used in 1899 and BX has been around since 1903 but not widely used until the 1930’s. NM cable first came onto the market in 1926. 1962 was the beginning of having  equipment grounding for all branch circuits popularized the use of NM cable with ground. This us just a small snippet of what is contained in the article. Click here for the entire article:  History_of_Residential_Wiring_practices_in_the_USA

What makes a good inspector and a good inspection report

I recently saw this on an inspection report by someone north of Palm Beach County:

Inspection reportRoof has 2 layers on it. This is not a recommended method of roofing for Florida and may present issues with obtaining insurance or financing. • Sagging / buckling on roof decking. • Damaged and rotted sheathing noted. • Recommend roofing contractor to evaluate. In the attic: Evidence of past or present leaks observed in several areas. Tested dry at time of the inspection. Monitor for leaks &/or have roofing contractor evaluate.

If you were buying this home, what would you think of this statement. I would be irritated if this was in a report on a home that I was buying. These statements mean absolutely nothing to someone not versed in construction or the building codes. If this inspector had any knowledge of the codes he would have known that yes, you can do a roof over, but only if certain conditions are met. One of those conditions is the roof decking has to be in good shape, of which this deck was not – that is why they did the roof over – to stop the roof from leaking.

This inspector is obviously either deficient in his education or very realtor friendly and does not want to write anything that would hold up the sale or cause the sale to not go though. It should have been clear to him that the roof needs to be replaced, as it was done wrong in the first place. Recommending that a roofing contractor evaluate the roof does two things. Is shows lack of knowledge on the part of the inspector, and now it will cost the buyer to spend more money to have the roof inspected, which is what he paid the inspector for. With the time constraints put on real estate sales today, there might not be time to get an opinion from a roofing contractor.

But don’t worry about the client, because this inspector is part of an association that will buy the house back for the purchase price, but that would depend on the interpretation on whether or not the association felt that the report had enough information in it that the buyer should have known, or had paid for a roofing contractor to come out and inspect the roof. And that brings me to another whole story. Do you think any buyer really wants to buy a home, pay all of the expenses on the home, ie closing costs, escrow to close, title insurance, and then only be paid back the purchase price, plus having to move again, which is costly.

It is important when you are buying a home to hire an experienced inspector. Do not take any recommendations without doing some homework. Part of that homework should be to review some sample reports from prospective inspectors. The ones that recommend further evaluation on most items are the inspectors you want to toss to the side. That roof should have been written up as a replacement. Based on the size of that home and the fact that there would be an extra charge to tear off the extra layer, a new roof would cost between $10,000.00 and $12,000.00. As a client, wouldn’t you want to know that so you could either negotiate for an new roof, or credit, or, if need be, walk away from the deal if the numbers did not meet your satisfaction.

Posted by Bill Siegel Florida Home Inspection Team Inc